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THE MUSEUM SHIP NORGOMA

Welcome to the Norgoma's site, enjoy your stay!

NORGOMA AS A PASSENGER SHIP

Passengers on the Sundeck in folding chairs

​Passengers enjoying the Sundeck

 

For the next thirteen years, thousands of passengers would sail on the Norgoma, following the coastal route known as the Turkey Trail west to Sault Ste. Marie.

The Norgoma not only served the needs of an isolated region of the Upper Great Lakes, she offered an unparalleled opportunity to view some of the most striking scenery to be found in Canada.

 Sundown

SOME INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT THE SHIP

 

  • The ship is 185 feet long, 36 feet wide on the Main deck and draws 12 feet. 
    • The Norgoma contained sleeping accommodations for 100 people, a dining room that sat 50 people and a galley that could produce 144 meals three times a day.
      • Her cabins, lounges, tuck shop, washrooms and showers all reflect the style of a bygone era.
      • She was powered by a triple expansion steam engine that also powered her car elevator, heated the cabins and the food.
      • The ship’s superstructure, the main deck and Promenade Decks are made of steel but the Boat and Sundecks are made of 2 x 4 rough-cut tongue and groove wood.
      • The Norgoma was the last of a long line of passenger and freight vessels that were the lifeline of the North Channel communities located on the Turkey Trail.​ In 1963 after the Trans Canada Highway was completed, the Norgoma was operated as a car ferry between Tobermory and South Baymouth, until replaced by the Chi-Cheemaun in 1974.
      • In 1963 the steam engine was replaced with an 800 horsepower diesel, which gave a service speed of 13.5 knots.

Next: Read about life as a crew member

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